ACCIDENT LAW – Absence of “No Trespassing” signs held to constitute implied consent to presence on property

2015-10-05 | Matthew J. O'Keefe
mjokeefe@jacksonokeefe.com

Category: Personal Injury & Wrongful Death

Matthew J. O'Keefe

The Superior Court holds that a property owner who does not post a “No Trespassing” sign or otherwise restrict entry onto the property can be found to have provided implied consent to a salesperson entering the property.  On the homeowner’s Motion for Summary Judgment, the defendant argued that the door-to-door salesperson was a trespasser.  The Superior Court rejects that argument and holds that issues of fact exist with regard to whether there was implied permission or consent to enter where the property owner did not restrict access or post “No Trespassing” signs.  Basso v. Catapano (August 25, 2015)

If you have a possible claim, you will need to review your options timely. For assistance, call the attorneys at Jackson O’Keefe now at (860) 276-8100.

With offices in Southington and Wethersfield, as well as satellite offices in East Haddam, Bloomfield and Farmington, our lawyers strive to meet the needs of area residents, making getting your legal services easier than ever.  Call us now to speak with us about your case.  860.276.8100

 

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